(847) 835-1302
We're currently open
 (847) 835-1302
We're currently open

Feline Care Guides

  • 10 HOUSEHOLD PLANTS THAT ARE DANGEROUS TO DOGS AND CATS – Feline - Over 700 indoor/outdoor plants contain toxic substances that may harm dogs and cats. If these plants are ingested, signs of poisoning can be mild to severe, sometimes even causing death. Most houseplants have multiple names, so it is important to confirm that the houseplants you currently own or may purchase are not toxic to your […]
  • A PET OWNER’S GUIDE TO FLEA CONTROL – Feline - Adult fleas are only part of the problem. Immature fleas (eggs and larvae) contribute to flea infestation, too. Your pet does not have to go outside to get fleas. Your veterinarian is a reliable source of information on safe and effective flea control products for your pet and home. What Are Fleas? Fleas are blood-feeding […]
  • ACTH STIMULATION TEST – Feline - ACTH (adrenocorticotropic hormone) is a hormone produced by the brain that stimulates the adrenal glands to release cortisol and other hormones. Two medical conditions, Cushing’s disease and Addison’s disease, occur when the body’s regulation of adrenal gland hormones is altered. The ACTH stimulation test can help your veterinarian diagnose Cushing’s disease or Addison’s disease. What […]
  • ABDOMINAL RADIOGRAPHY – Feline - Abdominal radiography is painless, very safe, and noninvasive, and it can sometimes be performed during an outpatient visit while you wait. Abdominal radiography is useful for evaluating the size, shape, and position of abdominal organs. Sedation is sometimes recommended for patients undergoing radiography. Radiography can help your veterinarian diagnose numerous medical conditions involving the intestines, […]
  • ACETAMINOPHEN TOXICITY – Canine - Acetaminophen can be toxic to dogs and cats, but cats are 7 to 10 times more susceptible to acetaminophen toxicity than dogs are. Once swallowed, acetaminophen reaches the blood stream within 30 minutes; toxic effects are rapid and damage the liver and red blood cells. Never give a medication intended for people to your pet […]
  • ADDISON’S DISEASE – Feline - Addison’s disease occurs when the body cannot produce adequate amounts of certain hormones, including a hormone called cortisol. Addison’s disease tends to affect young to middle-aged dogs, and females are more commonly affected than males. It is rare in cats. Diagnosis can be complicated, but most dogs respond well to appropriate treatment and can live normal […]
  • ADMINISTERING INJECTABLE MEDICATION TO YOUR CAT – Feline - Most injectable medications given at home are administered by injection directly under the skin (known as subcutaneous injection). Do not risk being bitten, scratched, or otherwise injured trying to medicate your pet. If you are unable to administer medication, your veterinarian may be able to offer other options. Your veterinary health care team will work with […]
  • ADMINISTERING MEDICATIONS TO YOUR CAT – Feline - Before you leave your veterinarian’s office with a new medication, be sure to address any concerns or questions with your veterinary team. It is very important to follow all label directions carefully. Do not risk being bitten, scratched, or otherwise injured while trying to medicate your cat. If you are unable to administer medication, your […]
  • ADMINISTERING SUBCUTANEOUS FLUIDS TO YOUR CAT – Feline - The procedure of injecting a sterile fluid solution directly under the skin is referred to as subcutaneous fluid administration. The advantages of the subcutaneous fluid route include a lower cost (compared with the intravenous route) and ease of administration. Your veterinary health team will work with you to make sure you know how to give subcutaneous […]
  • ADOPTING INSTEAD OF BUYING A PET – Feline - While estimates vary, approximately three to four million dogs and cats are euthanized (“put to sleep”) each year in the United States because too few people spay or neuter the pets they have, too few adopt their new pets, and too many give up their pets. By adopting a pet from an animal shelter or […]
  • ALKALINE PHOSPHATASE LEVEL – Feline - Although alkaline phosphatase is considered a “liver enzyme,” it is produced by other cells, too. Alkaline phosphatase levels can be affected by many things, including certain medications and a variety of illnesses. If your pet’s alkaline phosphatase level is abnormal, additional tests may be recommended to determine the cause. What Is Alkaline Phosphatase? Alkaline phosphatase […]
  • ALLERGY TESTING – Feline - Allergy testing is most commonly performed to determine if a pet has atopy, also known as atopic dermatitis or allergic inhalant dermatitis. Allergy tests can help identify the specific allergens causing a pet’s allergy problem. Once a list of “problem” allergens is identified, a specialized serum containing small quantities of these allergens can be formulated specifically for your […]
  • ALOPECIA – Feline - Alopecia (hair loss) can occur when hair fails to grow at a normal rate or when hair is lost more quickly than it can grow back. Alopecia can result from a variety of medical conditions, including skin infections, hormonal diseases, and infestations with fleas or mites. Many causes of alopecia are treatable. If the hair […]
  • ANAL SAC DISEASE – Feline - All dogs and cats have two anal glands located beside their anus. These glands are often called anal sacs. Most animals express their anal sacs when they defecate. Some animals experience a build up of fluid in their anal sacs, which can lead to discomfort and itching. Anal sacs can become infected or abscessed (pus-filled and […]
  • ANEMIA IN CATS – Feline - Anemia in cats has many possible causes, and it can range in severity from mild to severe.  Severe anemia is life threatening and requires immediate veterinary care. Anemia results from a loss or destruction of red blood cells or from a failure of the body to produce enough red blood cells.  Red blood cells carry […]
  • ANTIBIOTIC THERAPY FOR EAR INFECTIONS – Feline - Any pet can develop an ear infection; underlying allergies or other illnesses are often the cause. Bacterial infection generally occurs secondary to the inflammation and unhealthy environment in the ear. A typical course of antibiotics can be as brief as 5 to 7 days, or as long as several months. It is best to give […]
  • ANTIFREEZETOXICOSIS – Feline - Antifreeze poisoning occurs when pets drink antifreeze containing ethylene glycol. The liver quickly breaks down ethylene glycol into toxic products that can lead to kidney failure and death. Even a small amount of antifreeze can be fatal to dogs and cats. Antifreeze poisoning is a medical emergency, and early treatment is crucial. Signs include: staggering, […]
  • ASPIRIN TOXICOSIS – Feline - High doses of aspirin can be poisonous (toxic) to dogs and cats; cats are more susceptible to aspirin toxicosis than dogs are. Toxic effects can occur within hours of the pet swallowing aspirin or may take a few days. Never administer a medication intended for humans to your pet unless instructed to do so by […]
  • AVOIDING INJURY: TIPS FOR INTERPRETING SIGNS OF AGGRESSION IN CATS – Feline - Most cats exhibit outward signs when they are unhappy or angry about something. Understanding those behaviors may save you from injury. Show children how to play gently with cats, and discourage them from chasing or restraining a cat. Never approach a strange cat. If you must interact with one, let it approach you. Despite centuries […]
  • BUN – Feline - The liver and kidneys are both involved in maintaining the body’s BUN (blood urea nitrogen) level. The BUN level can be affected by many things, including certain medications and various illnesses. If your pet’s BUN level is abnormal, additional tests may be recommended to determine the cause. What Is BUN? BUN stands for blood urea nitrogen. The […]
  • BUN AND CREATININE LEVELS – Feline - Taken together, the blood urea nitrogen (BUN) and creatinine levels can provide useful information about kidney function. The BUN and creatinine levels can be affected by many things, including certain medications and various illnesses. If your pet’s BUN or creatinine level is abnormal, additional tests may be recommended to determine the cause. What Are BUN […]
  • BARTONELLOSIS (CAT-SCRATCH DISEASE) – Feline - Bartonellosis (also known as Bartonella infection) is a bacterial disease that can infect many different species, including cats and humans. People with weakened immune systems are at increased risk of infection. Bartonella infection may cause chronic inflammatory conditions in cats, such as stomatitis (inflammation of the mouth), gingivitis (inflammation of the gums), and inflammatory bowel disease. Some cats […]
  • BATHING YOUR CAT – Feline - Reasons to Bathe Your Cat Cats, by nature, are very good groomers. They have pointy structures on the surface of their tongues, called papillae, which are designed to be an essential grooming tool. While they do a good job on their own, there are situations when your cat may need a bath: If your cat comes […]
  • BIOPSY – Feline - A biopsy allows your veterinarian to determine the types of cells in a tissue sample. Biopsies are commonly used to determine if growths are cancerous but can also help determine the severity of a disease. The tissue removed during a biopsy is examined under a microscope by a veterinary pathologist, a specialist in examining cells […]
  • BITE-WOUND ABSCESSES IN CATS – Feline - An abscess forms when infection, inflammation, and damaged cells cannot be cleared by the body. Abscesses can occur when bacteria are deposited under the skin (as with bite wounds or other wounds). Abscesses can cause pain, fever, and lethargy (tiredness) until the infection is cleared up. Abscesses are treated with antibiotics and possibly surgery, depending […]
  • BREAST CANCER IN DOGS AND CATS – Feline - Breast cancer is the uncontrolled growth of abnormal mammary gland (breast) cells. Tumors occur most frequently in older, female pets that have not been spayed. Most (80% to 90%) mammary tumors in cats are malignant (cancerous), while 50% of mammary masses in dogs are malignant. While the cause of breast cancer is unknown, hormones are […]
  • BREEDING YOUR CAT – Feline - There are currently more cats in the United States than there are homes for them. As a result, millions of cats are surrendered to shelters and euthanized each year. Breeding should only be done to improve the breed, which requires a strong knowledge of the pedigrees and health histories of both the female and male […]
  • BLADDER STONES AND KIDNEY STONES – Feline - Urinary stones are made of minerals and can form anywhere in the urinary tract of dogs and cats. These stones can irritate the bladder lining and obstruct urine flow from the kidney to the bladder or from the bladder out of the body. Signs may include more frequent urination, blood in the urine, urinary accidents, […]
  • BLOOD PRESSURE TEST – Feline - An (indirect) blood pressure test measures the pressure of blood against the walls of large arteries. It is a noninvasive, painless procedure that can be performed on an outpatient basis. Your veterinarian may recommend a blood pressure test if your pet shows signs of high blood pressure or has been diagnosed with a disease associated […]
  • BRINGING A NEW KITTEN HOME – Feline - Your kitten must receive veterinary care before being introduced to other cats. Your kitten must be vaccinated against various diseases on a schedule, beginning at 2 to 3 months of age. Your kitten should be spayed or neutered by 6 months of age. Proper nutrition is especially important for kittens, which need two to three […]
  • CHERRY EYE (PROLAPSED NICTITANS GLAND) – Feline - Cherry eye is a condition in which the tear-producing gland of the eye appears as a red, round mass on the inside corner of the pet’s eye. The condition usually occurs in young dogs and, rarely, in cats. Surgical correction is usually required to secure the gland in place behind the third eyelid. What Is […]
  • CHEST RADIOGRAPHY – Feline - Chest radiography is painless, very safe, and noninvasive, and it can sometimes be performed during an outpatient visit while you wait. Chest radiography helps evaluate the size, shape, and position of the heart. Chest radiography helps evaluate the lungs for the presence of fluid or other abnormalities. Radiography can help your veterinarian diagnose numerous medical […]
  • CHOCOLATE TOXICOSIS – Feline - Toxicosis is disease due to poisoning. Chocolate toxicosis is a common problem in dogs, but less common in cats. Depending on how much chocolate is ingested, the signs can range from a simple stomach upset to life-threatening problems. The toxic ingredients in chocolate include caffeine and a chemical called theobromine. Dark chocolate and baking chocolate are […]
  • CHRONIC KIDNEY DISEASE – Feline - Kidney disease is a very general term used to describe several conditions that can affect the kidneys or damage kidney cells. Some types of kidney disease are reversible. Chronic kidney disease is a progressive disease that is not curable. Clinical signs associated with chronic kidney disease include increased drinking and urination, weight loss, and appetite loss. […]
  • CHRONIC OTITIS – Feline - Chronic ear infections may involve bacterial or yeast overgrowth in the external, middle, or inner ear. Chronic infection can permanently damage the ear canal and cause pain, neurologic signs, and deafness. Ear infections are usually secondary to an underlying condition that allows for an unhealthy ear environment. Treatment is based on eliminating the bacteria or […]
  • COCCIDIOSIS – Feline - Coccidiosis is an intestinal condition caused by a single-celled parasite. Dogs and cats swallow cysts containing the parasite from contaminated environments, usually during grooming. Signs of coccidiosis include watery diarrhea with blood or mucus, and possibly vomiting and lethargy (tiredness). Puppies and kittens are more severely affected than adult animals. People cannot be infected with […]
  • COGNITIVE DYSFUNCTION – Feline - Cognitive dysfunction (CD) in dogs and cats can be compared with Alzheimer’s disease in humans, although the conditions are not identical. Before diagnosing CD, your veterinarian may recommend diagnostic testing to rule out other medical conditions that can cause similar clinical signs. Medications can help some pets with CD. There is a diet for dogs […]
  • COLITIS – Feline - Colitis is a condition in which the colon, the last portion of the digestive tract, is inflamed. Dogs and cats may experience colitis for a few days or for many months. Signs of colitis include diarrhea with mucus and/or fresh blood, straining to defecate, and possibly vomiting. There are many causes of colitis, including stress, […]
  • COMMON HOUSEHOLD POISONS – Feline - Many common food items or household products can sicken or even kill animals. Be aware of what substances may be toxic to your pet, and store and use them safely. If you think your pet has eaten something poisonous, call your veterinarian or a pet poison hotline immediately. The Basics Your home can hold a […]
  • CONGESTIVE HEART FAILURE IN CATS – Feline - Congestive heart failure is a condition in which a cat’s heart cannot deliver sufficient blood to the body. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (a thickening of the heart walls) is one of the more common causes of this condition in cats. Signs include difficult or rapid breathing, weakness, lethargy (tiredness), and loss of appetite. Diagnostics to determine the […]
  • CONJUNCTIVITIS – Feline - Conjunctivitis is inflammation of the conjunctiva (the tissues lining the inner eyelids and the white portion of the eye). Diagnosis is based on physical examination findings, but fluorescein staining and other tests may be recommended to determine the extent of the problem. Treatment usually involves applying medication to the eyes; follow-up examinations and diagnostic testing […]
  • CONSTIPATION AND OBSTIPATION IN CATS – Feline - Constipation is a condition in which a cat passes feces less often or in smaller amounts than normal. Obstipation occurs when severe constipation makes defecation impossible or nearly impossible. Signs include infrequent or no defecation, straining to defecate, hard and dry feces, vomiting, or loss of appetite. There are numerous causes for these conditions, such […]
  • COPING WITH CANCER – Feline - Cancer is extremely common in pets. Cancer can be successfully managed in many cases. Most pets tolerate treatment extremely well. An accurate diagnosis and proper staging of a pet’s cancer are essential in order to pursue the best treatment and achieve the best possible outcome. Cancer treatment in pets is designed to provide the best […]
  • COPING WITH THE LOSS OF A PET – Feline - Grief is a natural reaction to the loss of a pet. Everyone grieves differently. Pet-loss support resources exist and may be helpful for you. The Five Stages of Grief Grief is a natural reaction to the loss of a pet. Regardless of whether the pet is old or young, or whether the loss is expected […]
  • CORNEAL ULCERATION – Feline - The cornea is the clear covering of cells on the front of the eye; it can become damaged if scratched or irritated. Corneal ulcers can be very painful and can cause eye redness, tearing, and squinting. Corneal ulceration is a common eye condition of dogs and cats. If corneal ulceration is not treated quickly and […]
  • CREATININE LEVEL – Feline - The kidneys are largely responsible for maintaining the body’s creatinine level within a healthy range. The creatinine level can be affected by many things, including certain medications and various illnesses. If your pet’s creatinine level is abnormal, additional tests may be recommended to determine the cause. What Is Creatinine? Creatinine is a substance that the […]
  • CUSHING’S DISEASE – Feline - Cushing’s disease occurs when the body produces excessive amounts of a hormone called cortisol. Cushing’s disease affects middle-aged and older dogs. It is rare in cats. Diagnosis can be difficult and may require several different types of tests. Surgery is an option for some dogs, but most dogs receive medication to control the condition. What Is […]
  • DECLAW SURGERY IN CATS – Feline - Scratching is a natural cat behavior, but it can be destructive in a household. Declaw surgery generally involves the removal of all or a portion of the last bone in each digit of the forepaws. Younger cats (under a year of age) tolerate the surgery better than older or obese cats. Declawing is painful and […]
  • DEMODECTIC MANGE – Feline - Demodectic mange is an inflammatory skin condition caused by microscopic mites of the genus Demodex. It is most common in young dogs and rare in cats. Signs include scaly patches of bare skin, which may or may not be itchy. Your veterinarian can diagnose the condition by taking a sample from your pet’s skin and examining […]
  • DENTAL CARE – Feline - Without routine dental care, most dogs and cats develop periodontal (dental) disease by 3 years of age. Periodontal disease is the most common health problem in dogs and cats. Bad breath may be a sign of periodontal disease in your pet. Providing routine dental care for your pet can be easy and can benefit your […]
  • DENTAL CLEANING – Feline - 85% of all pets have periodontal disease by the time they are 3 years of age. Dental disease can result in bad breath, painful chewing, and tooth loss. Bacteria under the gum can travel to the heart, kidneys, and liver. A professional dental cleaning is required to remove plaque and tartar from a pet’s teeth […]
  • DENTAL EXAM – Feline - A dental exam is performed by your veterinarian to determine the overall dental health of your pet. A dental exam can help identify early signs of dental disease. Left untreated, periodontal disease can lead to kidney problems, heart disease, and other health issues. What Is a Dental Exam? The term dental disease in dogs and cats is […]
  • DENTAL RADIOGRAPHY – Feline - Dental radiography is painless, very safe, and noninvasive. Dental radiography is useful for evaluating tooth roots and surrounding bone. Sedation or anesthesia is necessary so that your pet can be properly positioned for dental radiography. What Is Dental Radiography? A radiograph (sometimes called an x-ray) is a type of photograph that reveals the body’s bones and […]
  • DESOXYCORTICOSTERONE PIVALATE (DOCP) FOR ADDISON’S DISEASE – Feline - Addison’s disease occurs when the body cannot produce adequate amounts of certain hormones, including a hormone called cortisol. Desoxycorticosterone pivalate (DOCP) is an injectable medication used to help manage Addison’s disease. Most pets with Addison’s disease respond well to appropriate treatment and can live normal life spans. What Is Addison’s Disease? Glucocorticoids (primarily cortisol) and mineralocorticoids are two important […]
  • DEWCLAW REMOVAL – Feline - Dewclaw removal may be recommended if the dewclaw is deformed or if extra dewclaws are present. Dewclaw removal may also be recommended for hunting or working dogs or if there is a risk of trauma to the toe. Dewclaw removal is frequently performed when pets are very young (between 3 and 5 days old). Most […]
  • DEWORMING AND PREVENTION OF GASTROINTESTINAL PARASITES IN DOGS AND CATS – Feline - Gastrointestinal parasites can cause serious illness in pets, and some parasites can infect humans. Deworming involves administering medication to treat and control gastrointestinal parasites. Your veterinarian can recommend the most appropriate deworming medications for your pet. Any new pet entering your home should be tested for parasites as soon as possible and treated if parasites […]
  • DEXAMETHASONE SUPPRESSION TEST – Feline - A dexamethasone suppression test is used to help diagnose Cushing disease (a condition involving the adrenal glands) in dogs. Cushing disease affects the way the body produces the hormone cortisol, which has many functions in the body. Dexamethasone suppression testing can usually be performed at your veterinarian’s office and takes a few hours to complete. […]
  • DIABETES INSIPIDUS IN CATS – Feline - Diabetes insipidus occurs when the body is unable to produce an adequate amount of the hormone vasopressin (also called anti-diuretic hormone [ADH]). Affected cats drink excessively because they lose excessive amounts of fluid through urination. With treatment, cats with diabetes insipidus can live a normal life span and enjoy a relatively normal life. What Is Diabetes Insipidus? […]
  • DIARRHEA – Feline - Diarrhea is feces that is looser or more watery than normal. Pets with diarrhea may defecate more frequently than usual, have accidents in the house, and may have blood, mucus, or parasites in their feces. Puppies and kittens with diarrhea, as well as pets showing signs of vomiting and lethargy (tiredness), should be seen by […]
  • DIGOXIN LEVEL TEST – Feline - Digoxin is a medication used to treat congestive heart failure and certain heart rhythm abnormalities in dogs and cats. A digoxin level test requires a blood sample from your dog or cat, and the test can be performed at the hospital on an outpatient basis. The test results help determine if the dose of digoxin […]
  • EAR CLEANING – Feline - Ear cleaning can help treat or prevent ear problems. Follow your veterinarian’s recommendations closely. Always put health and safety first. If the procedure seems dangerous to you or very painful for your pet, stop and consult your veterinarian. The Basics Ear cleaning can help treat or prevent ear problems. Some pets are prone to ear […]
  • EAR HEMATOMA – Feline - An ear hematoma is a pocket of blood that forms inside the exterior portion of the ear. Often, ear mites or an infection in the ear canal cause a pet to scratch or shake his or her head. If aggressive scratching or head shaking causes the blood vessels inside the ear to break, a hematoma […]
  • EAR INFECTIONS AND YOUR PET – Feline - Any pet can develop an ear infection, regardless of ear shape, exposure to water (swimming), or the amount of hair inside the ear canal. Underlying allergies or other illnesses can cause ear infections to develop. Diagnosis is based on physical examination findings, but diagnostic testing may be recommended to investigate underlying factors contributing to the […]
  • EAR MITES IN DOGS AND CATS – Feline - The scientific name for ear mites is Otodectes cynotis. Ear mites are contagious to other animals but not to humans. Ear mite infestation can cause secondary ear infections, but the mites and infections are both treatable with medication. What Are Ear Mites? Ear mites are small parasites that live on an animal’s body, particularly in the […]
  • ELECTROCARDIOGRAPHY – Feline - An electrocardiogram (ECG) is a test that helps to determine the heart’s rhythm and rate. Your veterinarian may need to combine ECG results with results of blood work, x-rays, and possibly cardiac ultrasound to get a clear idea of how your pet’s heart is functioning. An ECG is safe and noninvasive and takes only a […]
  • ENDOCARDITIS – Feline - Endocarditis is an infection of the heart valves and/or inside lining of the heart. The disease is more common in dogs than cats and usually affects male dogs. Endocarditis occurs when bacteria from another location in the body travel through the blood to the heart. Signs of endocarditis include coughing, difficulty breathing, getting tired quickly, […]
  • ENDOSCOPY – Feline - Endoscopy is a procedure that allows your veterinarian to look inside your pet’s body without surgery. A flexible or rigid scope with a camera attached is inserted into a body cavity to view internal organs and the interior of joints. Endoscopy can be used to diagnose and treat problems. General anesthesia is required. Endoscopy is […]
  • EXAMINATION AND RABIES VACCINE – Feline - Regular examinations are essential to maintaining your pet’s health. A thorough physical examination checks every major body system. Periodic vaccine risk assessments help ensure that your pet is properly immunized against infectious diseases. Rabies is a deadly disease that is generally fatal in all species. Vaccination against rabies is required by law in most states. […]
  • EXERCISING YOUR CAT – Feline - Regular exercise is important to your cat’s health because it burns calories, reduces appetite, maintains muscle tone, and increases metabolism (the rate at which calories are burned). You can help your cat become more active and stay fit by scheduling regular playtimes. Consult your veterinarian before beginning an exercise program for your cat. Cats are […]
  • EXPLAINING PET LOSS TO CHILDREN – Feline - Our companion animals are often treasured members of the family, and we mourn for them when they die or are euthanized. It is important to recognize your feelings of loss and grief and to express them in your own way. In addition, when your child is attached to a pet that dies or is euthanized, […]
  • EYE DISCHARGE – Feline - Some pets produce more tears than others, so increased wetness of the eye is not always a medical problem. Eye discharge becomes a problem when it is excessive, abnormal, or accompanied by other signs of a problem (such as squinting, rubbing, or sneezing). Depending on the cause of the eye discharge, drops or ointments applied […]
  • FECAL ANALYSIS – Feline - Fecal analysis helps your veterinarian determine if your pet has intestinal parasites. Only a small sample of your pet’s stool is required to perform a fecal analysis. Fecal analysis may be recommended if your pet develops diarrhea, weight loss, or vomiting; however, even pets that don’t seem ill can benefit from periodic fecal evaluations. What […]
  • FECAL CENTRIFUGATION TESTING – Feline - Intestinal parasites can cause serious illness and even death in pets. Some parasites are zoonotic, which means humans can become infected. Fecal centrifugation testing can identify intestinal parasites, which is important for determining the best treatment and helping to ensure a full recovery. Even pets receiving parasite preventive medication need periodic parasite testing, because no […]
  • FECAL FLOTATION AND GIARDIA TEST – Feline - Intestinal parasites can cause serious illness and even death in pets. Some parasites are zoonotic, which means they can infect humans. Fecal flotation and Giardia testing can identify intestinal parasites, which is important for determining the best treatment and helping to ensure a full recovery. Even pets that are receiving regular parasite preventive medication need periodic parasite testing. […]
  • FECAL SMEAR – Feline - A fecal smear is a thin layer of feces that is examined under a microscope. The smear is usually performed in combination with other tests to identify possible causes of diarrhea. Ideally, the sample should be examined within 30 minutes of collection. Fecal smears are generally used to identify Giardia, a protozoan parasite that causes diarrhea. Fecal […]
  • FEEDING YOUR NEW KITTEN – Feline - Proper nutrition is especially important for kittens, which need two to three times as many calories and nutrients as adult cats. Cow’s milk should never be given to kittens or cats because it can give them diarrhea. Feed a name-brand kitten food with the American Association of Feed Control Officials (AAFCO) statement on the bag […]
  • FELINE ANESTHESIA – Feline - Anesthesia is useful for many procedures, including surgery, biopsies, x-rays, and dental exams and cleanings. Your veterinarian may select local anesthesia, injectable general anesthesia, or inhaled general anesthesia to keep your pet pain-free during surgical or diagnostic procedures. Your veterinarian is extensively trained in performing anesthesia and will take every possible precaution to help ensure […]
  • FELINE ARTHRITIS – Feline - Thinning of joint cartilage can lead to a vicious cycle of joint deterioration, reduced mobility, and pain. Supportive care is important, and treatment may include pain medication, NSAIDs, corticosteroids, supplements, massage, acupuncture, warm compresses, and/or surgery. Regular, moderate exercise may help delay feline arthritis. What Is It? Arthritis is a joint problem that can reduce […]
  • FELINE ASTHMA – Feline - Feline asthma can be a life-threatening condition. Affected cats show signs of breathing difficulty, coughing, and wheezing. Long-term treatment is often necessary to control the clinical signs and promote easier breathing. What Is Feline Asthma? Feline asthma is a respiratory condition that involves constriction and inflammation of the airways in the lungs. Any cat can develop asthma. The […]
  • FELINE BORDETELLOSIS – Feline - Feline bordetellosis is a contagious respiratory infection caused by the bacterium Bordetella bronchiseptica. Signs of this disease include sneezing, nasal and eye discharge, difficulty breathing, fever, enlarged lymph nodes and, less often, coughing. The bacterium is transmitted to cats through contact with infected cats, and sometimes dogs, or by exposure to secretions from the nose, throat, […]
  • FELINE CALICIVIRUS – Feline - Along with the rhinotracheitis virus, feline calicivirus (FCV) is responsible for most feline upper respiratory infections. Cats that go outside or spend time around other cats are at increased risk for exposure to FCV infection. Vaccination can protect cats from disease associated with FCV. What Is Calicivirus? Feline upper airway infections, sometimes called upper respiratory infections, […]
  • FELINE CHLAMYDIOSIS VACCINE – Feline - Feline chlamydiosis is contagious among cats and tends to be spread through direct contact with infected cats. Vaccinating cats against feline chlamydiosis reduces the severity of clinical signs in infected cats. Separating sick cats from healthy ones and keeping the environment clean are good methods for preventing disease spread. What Is Feline Chlamydiosis? Feline chlamydiosis […]
  • FELINE DIABETES MELLITUS – Feline - Most diabetic cats have diabetes mellitus type 2, meaning the body’s cells develop a “resistance” to insulin; sometimes the body fails to make enough insulin to serve its needs (diabetes mellitus type 1). After treatment for diabetes is started, periodic blood and urine testing may be recommended to help ensure that the current treatment (including […]
  • FELINE DISTEMPER AND FELINE LEUKEMIA – Feline - Feline distemper and feline leukemia are serious infections that can be fatal. Cats that go outside are at increased risk for exposure to feline distemper and feline leukemia. Vaccination can protect cats from disease associated with feline distemper and feline leukemia. What Are Feline Distemper and Feline Leukemia? Feline distemper is the common name for the […]
  • FELINE DISTEMPER AND RABIES – Feline - Feline distemper and rabies are serious infections that can be fatal. Cats that go outside are at increased risk for exposure to feline distemper and rabies. Vaccination can protect cats from disease associated with the feline distemper and rabies viruses. What Are Feline Distemper and Rabies? Feline distemper is the common name for the feline panleukopenia […]
  • FELINE HYPERTROPHIC CARDIOMYOPATHY – Feline - Feline hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is an inherited disease of the heart muscle; however, the specifics of its genetic inheritance are not fully understood. With HCM, the heart walls become so thickened and rigid that very little blood is able to be pumped through the heart. Medications to lessen the workload on the heart can help […]
  • FELINE HYPERVOCALIZATION – Feline - Excessive vocalization is called hypervocalization. If you think that your cat might be hypervocalizing because of pain, take him or her to your veterinarian. The most common reason that cats hypervocalize is that they have learned that it helps them get what they want. Most cat owners appreciate some vocalization—meowing, purring, etc.—from their cats. The many […]
  • FELINE IMMUNODEFICIENCY VIRUS – Feline - Infection with feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) is a contagious, untreatable disease. Cats that go outside are at increased risk for exposure to FIV. Vaccination can help prevent infection with FIV. What Is Feline Immunodeficiency Virus? Feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) is contagious among cats. Although FIV is not contagious to humans, FIV has some similarities to […]
  • FELINE LEUKEMIA VIRUS – Feline - Feline leukemia is a contagious, untreatable disease that can be fatal. Feline leukemia has been linked to the development of certain cancers in cats. Cats that go outside are at increased risk for exposure to feline leukemia. Vaccination can aid in the prevention of disease associated with feline leukemia. What Is Feline Leukemia? Feline leukemia […]
  • FELINE LEUKEMIA AND RABIES – Feline - Feline leukemia and rabies are contagious, untreatable, and commonly fatal. Cats that go outside are at increased risk for exposure to feline leukemia and rabies. Vaccination can protect cats from disease associated with the feline leukemia and rabies viruses. What Are Feline Leukemia and Rabies? Feline leukemia virus (FeLV) is contagious among cats.  Unlike many […]
  • FELINE NUTRITION – Feline - Proper nutrition can help ensure that your cat has optimal health, resistance to disease, a healthy haircoat, a good quality of life, and a long life span. The best way to ensure that your cat is properly nourished is to provide a high-quality, well-balanced food that is appropriate for his or her age and/or condition. […]
  • FELINE OBESITY – Feline - Obesity (the storage of excess fat) is usually caused by excessive food intake and insufficient exercise. One of the biggest problems in pets is overfeeding. By examining your cat, your veterinarian can determine whether he or she is overweight or obese and help you create a weight-loss program. Cats can develop many obesity-related health problems. […]
  • FELINE PANCREATITIS – Feline - Pancreatitis is an inflammation of the pancreas, an organ in the abdomen that helps the body digest food. In cats, the clinical signs of pancreatitis can be vague, such as appetite loss, dehydration, and lethargy (tiredness). Treatment is aimed at supporting the patient, including nutritional supplementation, and minimizing clinical signs; cats with chronic pancreatitis can […]
  • FELINE SENIOR WELLNESS – Feline - As cats grow older, their bodies become less able to cope with physical or environmental stress. Cats are very good at hiding signs of illness, and health problems can appear quickly. Most experts agree that healthy senior cats should see their veterinarians every 6 months. When Is a Cat “Senior”? With many cats living well […]
  • FELINE STOMATITIS – Feline - Feline stomatitis is a severe, painful inflammation of a cat’s mouth and gums. Dental disease, certain viruses, and some other inflammatory conditions can cause feline stomatitis. The long-term outcome can vary. Many cats require long-term treatment to control the condition. What Is Feline Stomatitis? Feline stomatitis is a severe, painful inflammation of a cat’s mouth […]
  • FELINE UPPER AIRWAY INFECTIONS – Feline - Cats, especially kittens, often get upper airway infections. Approximately 90% of all upper airway infections in cats are caused by two common viruses: feline herpesvirus-1 and feline calicivirus. Depending on their cause, upper airway infections can quickly become serious, especially in kittens. If your cat shows any signs of respiratory illness, make an appointment with […]
  • FELINE URETHRAL OBSTRUCTION – Feline - Feline urethral obstruction is a potentially fatal condition, usually seen in male cats, during which urine is prevented from leaving the bladder. The urethra may be plugged with mucus, urinary sediment, or small bladder stones. Diet and bladder infections can have a role in the formation of urinary stones and sediment. Treatment involves relieving the […]
  • FELINE URINARY PROBLEMS – Feline - Cats can develop serious urinary problems, so it’s important to learn how to recognize trouble signs early. If your cat is unable to urinate, this is an emergency requiring immediate veterinary attention. A veterinary checkup is very important for a cat that changes his or her litterbox habits. There are several effective methods for treating […]
  • FELINE URINE MARKING – Feline - Feline urine marking is a normal form of communication between cats. Cats mark with urine to claim their territory. Urine marking occurs most commonly in male cats that have not been neutered. A cat that is urine marking typically stands upright with its tail erect, and sprays a small amount of liquid on walls and […]
  • FELINE VACCINE RECOMMENDATIONS – Feline - Vaccines are important for preventing infectious diseases. Over the years, the widespread use of vaccines has saved the lives of millions of cats. Vaccines are safe and generally well tolerated by most cats. Vaccine selection and scheduling should be an individualized choice that you and your veterinarian make together. Companion animals today have the opportunity […]
  • FIRST AID AND YOUR PET – Feline - One: Remain calm and try to keep your pet calm. Approach your pet with caution. An animal in pain may bite or scratch. Two: If some sort of stabilization is possible (for example, direct pressure to slow down bleeding), try it—ideally while on the way to the veterinarian. If this is not possible, just get to the […]
  • FLEA ALLERGY DERMATITIS (FAD) – Feline - Flea allergy dermatitis (FAD) is a severe allergic reaction to the bite of a flea. FAD can cause intense itching and painful skin wounds. Left untreated, affected animals can develop secondary skin infections. FAD can be treated by controlling fleas on the pet and removing fleas from the pet’s environment. Corticosteroids and antibiotics may be […]
  • FLEA AND TICK PREVENTION – Feline - Fleas and ticks are external parasites that can cause extreme discomfort and serious illness in pets and even people. Fleas and ticks are easily prevented from bothering your pet through the use of safe, easy to administer, effective products. Parasite prevention also may require treating your home and yard and keeping pets out of areas […]
  • FLUORESCEIN STAIN – Feline - Fluorescein stain can be applied to the eye to detect injuries involving the cornea. Corneal scratches, ulcers, or other defects can be diagnosed using fluorescein staining. Performing a fluorescein stain takes only a few minutes and is not painful for your pet. What Is a Fluorescein Stain? A fluorescein test is a test that can […]
  • FOLLOW-UP EXAMINATION – Feline - A follow-up examination is a physical examination that is usually performed a few weeks after the initial examination. The examination is scheduled to evaluate the effectiveness of treatment, assess healing after a surgical procedure, or monitor the progression of a disease. In addition to the examination, diagnostic tests, such as blood tests or radiography (obtaining […]
  • FOOD ALLERGY – Feline - A food allergy is an immune response to something in the pet’s diet that did not cause problems in the past. Food allergies commonly cause itchiness and/or vomiting and diarrhea in dogs and cats. Food allergies are diagnosed with an elimination diet trial. Long-term treatment can be very successful if the offending ingredient is avoided. […]
  • FRUCTOSAMINE TESTING – Feline - A fructosamine test is a blood test that helps monitor diabetic patients. Checking a pet’s fructosamine level can help your veterinarian ensure that a pet’s diabetes is being adequately managed. To perform a fructosamine test, a small amount of a pet’s blood is taken and submitted to a laboratory for analysis. The fructosamine level is […]
  • FUNGAL CULTURE – Feline - A fungal culture test is a method of identifying the specific fungus that may be causing an infection in or on the body. Performing a fungal culture test poses minimal risk to your pet, and in many cases, the information your veterinarian gains from this test is very valuable. What Is a Fungal Culture Test? […]
  • GASTROINTESTINAL PARASITES IN CATS – Feline - Gastrointestinal (GI) parasites can cause serious illness in cats; some parasites can also infect humans. Your veterinarian can recommend medications to treat and control GI parasites. Any new pet entering your home should be tested for parasites as soon as possible. What Are Gastrointestinal Parasites? Gastrointestinal (GI) parasites include any parasites that live in the […]
  • GETTING YOUR CAT BACK ON ITS FEET – Feline - The most effective way to treat lameness is to obtain an accurate diagnosis of what is wrong. Always strictly follow your veterinarian’s recommendations for rehabilitation and recovery. It is critical to keep all of your pet’s recommended follow-up appointments so that your veterinarian can monitor your pet’s progress. My Cat Is Limping—Now What? The most […]
  • GETTING A PET SITTER – Feline - Finding a pet sitter who you like and trust may take time, so begin your search long before your trip. To find a pet sitter, ask your veterinarian, favorite pet store, or pet-owning friends for a referral. You can also check the two major professional pet-sitting organizations—the National Association of Professional Pet Sitters (www.petsitters.org) and […]
  • GIARDIASIS – Feline - Giardia is a parasite that is found worldwide and in every region of the United States. Giardiasis (the disease that Giardia causes) can cause diarrhea, appetite loss, and vomiting. Giardiasis is transmitted to dogs and catsthrough contact with infected feces or with water, food, or soil that has been contaminated by infected feces. Pets can often be infected […]
  • GLAUCOMA TESTING – Feline - Glaucoma is a painful condition that can lead to blindness if left untreated. Glaucoma is less common in cats than in dogs. The process of measuring the pressure inside the eye is called tonometry. This procedure is used to diagnose glaucoma. What Is Glaucoma? The structures inside the eye, such as the iris and lens, are surrounded […]
  • GLUCOSE AND FRUCTOSAMINE TESTING – Feline - Blood glucose and fructosamine tests are helpful tools for monitoringdiabetic patients. The results of glucose and fructosamine testing can helpyour veterinarian ensure that your pet’s diabetes is being adequately managed. Only small amounts of blood are required to perform these tests. What Are Glucose Testing and Fructosamine Testing? In diabetic patients, spot-checking the blood glucose (or […]
  • GRIEF IN DOGS AND CATS – Feline - Based on observed changes in behavior, it is thought that some dogs and cats grieve after losing a close human or animal companion. Dogs and cats seem to show a wide variety of responses to losing a companion. As in people, signs of grief in pets usually improve with time. However, there are things you […]
  • GROOMING YOUR CAT – Feline - Regular brushing can help keep your cat’s skin and haircoat healthy. Groom your cat when he or she is relaxed, and start with short sessions. Try to make grooming a pleasant experience for your cat. If your cat seems uncomfortable with being groomed, stop. Ask your veterinarian about the best way to care for your […]
  • HEART MURMURS IN CATS – Feline - A heart murmur is an abnormal sound that a veterinarian hears when listening to the heart through a stethoscope. A murmur is not always a cause for concern, but it can be an indication of heart disease, so other diagnostic tests may be warranted. Found in young kittens, innocent murmurs are essentially harmless and usually […]
  • HEARTWORM DISEASE IN CATS – Feline - Heartworm disease attacks the lungs, heart, and related blood vessels. It is serious and potentially fatal. Heartworms are transmitted through the bite of an infected mosquito. There is no approved treatment for heartworm disease in cats. Illness is easily and effectively avoided by giving preventive medications. What Is Heartworm Disease? Heartworm disease is a serious […]
  • HEATSTROKE – Feline - Heatstroke is a life-threatening condition that occurs when body temperature reaches 106°F to 109°F. Being left in a hot car and exercising in hot weather are the most common causes of heatstroke in pets. “Cracking” car windows does not keep a car cool. Organ failure, seizures, and death are likely if treatment for heatstroke is not started […]
  • HELPING YOUR ARTHRITIC CAT – Feline - Arthritis is a joint problem that can reduce a cat’s mobility and cause severe, chronic pain. You can improve life for your arthritic cat by doing the following: Help your cat get or stay slim so that unnecessary weight doesn’t increase the load on your cat’s joints, resulting in more pain and inflammation. Ask your veterinarian […]
  • HELPING YOUR ITCHY PET – Feline - In some cases, multiple problems contribute to itching in pets. Scratching can quickly lead to skin damage, bleeding, hair loss, scabs, and secondary skin infections with bacteria or fungal organisms. Treatment for an itchy pet can require a long-term commitment. You should maintain communication with your veterinarian, especially if a treatment doesn’t seem to be […]
  • HELPING YOUR ARTHRITIC CAT – Feline - Arthritis is a joint problem that can reduce a cat’s mobility and cause severe, chronic pain. You can improve life for your arthritic cat by doing the following: Help your cat get or stay slim so that unnecessary weight doesn’t increase the load on your cat’s joints, resulting in more pain and inflammation. Ask your veterinarian […]
  • HELPING YOUR ITCHY PET – Feline - In some cases, multiple problems contribute to itching in pets. Scratching can quickly lead to skin damage, bleeding, hair loss, scabs, and secondary skin infections with bacteria or fungal organisms. Treatment for an itchy pet can require a long-term commitment. You should maintain communication with your veterinarian, especially if a treatment doesn’t seem to be […]
  • HEMATURIA – Feline - Hematuria is the condition of having blood in the urine. Bloody urine may be caused by abnormalities in the urinary tract or by disease processes elsewhere in the body that can affect the urinary tract. Hematuria may be an indication of a serious blood clotting or platelet disorder. Treatment varies depending on the cause. What […]
  • HEPATIC LIPIDOSIS – Feline - Hepatic lipidosis, or fatty liver disease, is the most common liver disease of cats in North America. It is caused by inadequate food intake or by diseases that may cause a cat to lose its appetite. Diagnosis may require blood tests, abdominal radiographs (x-rays), abdominal ultrasonography, and a liver biopsy. Treatment requires intensive feeding, often […]
  • HOOKWORMS – Feline - Hookworms are internal parasites that live in the small intestines of dogs and cats. People can be infected with hookworms when a hookworm larva penetrates their skin or when they unknowingly swallow infective hookworm eggs. Signs of hookworm infections in pets may include pale gums, tarry diarrhea, poor coat, lethargy, and failure to gain weight. […]
  • HOW TO ADMINISTER EAR MEDICATION TO YOUR CAT – Feline - Many outer ear infections in cats require medicine to be put directly into the ear. Follow your veterinarian’s recommendations closely. Always put health and safety first. If the procedure seems dangerous to you or very painful for your pet, stop and consult your veterinarian. The Basics Many outer ear infections in cats require medicine to […]
  • HOW TO ADMINISTER EYE MEDICATION TO YOUR CAT – Feline - Many eye conditions in cats require medicine to be put directly into the eye. Follow your veterinarian’s recommendations closely. Always put health and safety first. If the procedure seems dangerous to you or very painful for your pet, stop and consult your veterinarian. The Basics Many eye conditions in cats require medicine to be put […]
  • HOW TO ADMINISTER A TOPICAL MEDICATION TO YOUR CAT – Feline - Many conditions in cats require medicine to be applied to the skin. Follow your veterinarian’s recommendations closely. Always put health and safety first. If the procedure seems dangerous to you or very painful for your pet, stop and consult your veterinarian. The Basics Many conditions in cats require medicine to be applied to the skin. […]
  • HOW TO FIND A REPUTABLE BREEDER – Feline - Thorough research is important to ensure the breed fits with your lifestyle. Ask for recommendations, research websites, then interview and visit several breeders before making a decision. Reputable breeders will specialize in only one or two breeds, raise a limited number of litters a year, and offer a written contract with a health guarantee. A […]
  • HOW TO GIVE YOUR CAT A PILL – Feline - Medicines in pill or capsule form are prescribed to treat a variety of conditions. It is important to use only medicines prescribed by a veterinarian and to treat for the full length of time prescribed. Do not stop treatment early, even if the problem seems to be resolved. The Basics Medicines in pill or capsule […]
  • HOW TO KEEP YOUR CAT OFF TABLES AND COUNTERS – Feline - Cats naturally like high places, so keeping them off tables and counters can be difficult. It’s best not to try to stifle your cat’s natural jumping and climbing behavior. Your cat will be happier if you provide him or her with acceptable options for climbing and jumping. Never chase your cat away from an unacceptable […]
  • HOW TO TELL IF YOUR CAT IS SICK – Feline - Any change in your cat’s normal behavior, such as increased lethargy (tiredness), changes in appetite, weight loss, or hiding in the house may be indications that your cat is ill. Male cats that frequent the litter box but are unable to urinate should be seen by a veterinarian immediately. If your cat has eaten string, […]
  • HUMAN FOODS THAT ARE DANGEROUS FOR DOGS AND CATS – Feline - Some human foods can cause serious illness (and even death) in dogs and cats. Pets should not be given human food unless recommended by your veterinarian. If you suspect your pet may have eaten a dangerous food, contact your veterinarian immediately. What Do I Need to Know About Foods That Are Dangerous for My Pet? […]
  • HYPERTENSION AND YOUR PET – Feline - Hypertension, also known as high blood pressure, can affect dogs and cats. In people, the most common type of hypertension is known as primary or essential hypertension, which means that high blood pressure is the main disease process. Cats and dogs, on the other hand, rarely develop primary hypertension. Instead, hypertension in pets is usually the sign of another illness. […]
  • HYPERTHYROIDISM AND YOUR CAT – Feline - Hyperthyroidism occurs when a cat’s thyroid gland (an organ located at the front of the neck) produces excess amounts of thyroid hormone. Hyperthyroidism tends to affect middle-aged and older cats. Hyperthyroidism causes the heart to pump faster, which can lead to other problems such as high blood pressure and heart disease. In some cats with […]
  • IBUPROFEN AND NAPROXEN TOXICOSIS – Feline - Ibuprofen and naproxen can be toxic to dogs and cats, but cats are much more susceptible to this toxicity than dogs are. A single 200-milligram ibuprofen tablet can be toxic to a cat or small- to medium-sized dog; toxic effects can occur rapidly and damage the kidneys and stomach. Ibuprofen and naproxen are drugs intended […]
  • IMMUNE-MEDIATED HEMOLYTIC ANEMIA – Feline - Immune-mediated hemolytic anemia (IMHA) is a condition in which the body’s immune system attacks and destroys red blood cells. IMHA can be a primary condition, or it can be caused by another illness or event (including cancer, certain tick-transmitted diseases, or some viral and bacterial infections). IMHA can be fatal, even with aggressive treatment. For […]
  • IMMUNE-MEDIATED THROMBOCYTOPENIA – Feline - Immune-mediated thrombocytopenia (IMT) is a condition in which the body’s immune system attacks and destroys blood platelets. IMT can be a primary condition, or it can be caused by another illness (including cancer, certain tick-transmitted diseases, and some viral and bacterial infections). IMT generally responds to treatment, but it can be fatal. For pets that […]
  • INFLAMMATORY BOWEL DISEASE – Feline - Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a broad term for conditions that cause the lining of the digestive tract to become thickened and inflamed. IBD can occur in dogs and cats. Signs of IBD include chronic, intermittent vomiting and/or diarrhea, weight loss, and anorexia (appetite loss). The exact cause of IBD is unknown. Conclusive diagnosis of IBD […]
  • INJECTABLE MEDICATION – Feline - Some medications can only be administered by injection and must be given by a trained veterinary professional. Your veterinary care team will be glad to address any questions or concerns you may have about the injectable medication your pet is receiving. If your pet has any problems after receiving an injection, notify your veterinarian right […]
  • INTERVERTEBRAL DISK DISEASE – Feline - Intervertebral disk disease (IVDD) occurs when a disk between the vertebrae (bones of the spine) ruptures and pushes against the spinal cord. While IVDD can happen in cats, it’s more common in dogs, especially breeds such as dachshunds, basset hounds, and Welsh corgis. The signs of IVDD vary depending on the location and the degree […]
  • JOINT ARTHROSCOPY – Feline - Joint arthroscopy is a diagnostic and/or therapeutic technique that allows the veterinarian to look inside your pet’s joints through a very small skin incision. A pet’s joints can be examined for signs of degeneration or trauma. In some cases therapeutic procedures can be performed. Recovery time from arthroscopic versus “open” joint surgery is generally easier […]
  • KEEPING YOUR PET AT A HEALTHY WEIGHT – Feline - Nearly 50% of adult dogs and cats in the United States are overweight or obese. Obesity increases the risk for other serious health problems. Follow your veterinarian’s advice on which diet to feed your pet, how much, and how often. Give your pet plenty of opportunities for regular exercise that is appropriate for his or […]
  • KENNELING YOUR CAT – Feline - Even being in the best kennel is stressful for many cats. If your cat does not tolerate boarding well, consider using a pet sitter or arranging for your cat to stay in a room at a friend’s or relative’s house while you are traveling. Before kenneling your cat anywhere, be sure to visit the facilities […]
  • KIDNEY DISEASE IN PETS – Feline - Kidney disease is a very general term used to describe any one of several conditions that can affect the kidneys or damage kidney cells. Clinical signs associated with kidney disease can vary depending on the presentation (acute or chronic) and the underlying cause. Pets can sometimes experience a good quality of life for many years after […]
  • KITTEN SOCIALIZATION – Feline - Socialization is the learning process through which kittens become accustomed to being near various people, animals, and environments. Proper socialization can help eliminate behavior problems in the future and create a better bond between the pet and the family. When introducing kittens to new people, pets, or environments, provide praise or treats so the kitten […]
  • KITTEN OR ADULT CAT: WHICH IS RIGHT FOR YOU? – Feline - Americans own more than 90 million cats. Approximately 4 million homeless pets (cats and dogs) are euthanized each year; adopting your cat from a local animal shelter will help save a life. Choosing the right cat for you will create a happy, healthy relationship for both you and your cat. What Do I Need to […]
  • LACERATION REPAIR – Feline - A laceration is a cut or tear in the skin that may include damage to the muscles and other structures beneath the skin. While superficial (surface) wounds may sometimes be repaired using local anesthesia (which affects only the area of the wound), most laceration repairs require general (full) anesthesia of the pet. After the wound […]
  • LICK GRANULOMA – Feline - A lick granuloma is a thickened, hairless area of skin that results from excessive, repetitive licking or chewing. Signs of a lick granuloma include brown-stained hair around the lesion and an area of thickened skin that may be inflamed, infected, or ulcerated. The lesions usually occur on the lower legs of dogs. Excessive licking may […]
  • LIPOMA – Feline - A lipoma is a benign (noncancerous) mass made of fat cells. These lumps may appear just under the skin anywhere on the body or inside the chest and abdomen. Middle-aged and older female dogs are more likely to have lipomas. All skin lumps should be examined by a veterinarian. A lipoma is diagnosed with a […]
  • LITTERBOX TRAINING YOUR CAT – Feline - Cats are usually easy to litterbox train because they prefer to bury their waste. Cats may refuse to use the litterbox if something about it is unappealing. If you are having trouble litterbox training your cat, let your veterinarian know. Basic Training Cats are usually easy to litterbox train because they are naturally clean and […]
  • LIVER DISEASE TESTING – Feline - Liver disease is a very general term used to describe several conditions that can damage liver cells. Diagnosis of liver disease may require a combination of several tests. If liver disease progresses, it can eventually lead to decreased liver function, liver failure, and death. What Is Liver Disease? “Liver disease” is a very general term […]
  • LYMPHOMA (LYMPHOSARCOMA) – Feline - Lymphoma, or lymphosarcoma, is a cancer of the lymphocytes, which are a type of white blood cell associated with the immune system. The exact cause of lymphoma is unknown. Cats that are positive for feline leukemia virus (FeLV) are more likely to develop lymphoma than cats that test negative for the virus. Boxers, golden retrievers, […]
  • MALASSEZIA DERMATITIS – Feline - Malassezia dermatitis is a yeast infection of the skin. It varies in severity from a mild itch to severe skin changes (in its most severe form, the skin thickens to resemble an elephant’s skin). It is usually secondary to a problem such as allergies or hormonal imbalances. Treatment is aimed at clearing the infection and treating […]
  • MEDICAL CAUSES OF WEIGHT LOSS – Feline - A variety of medical conditions can cause weight loss. Weight loss is not a disease—it is a sign of an illness. Therefore, the treatment for weight loss depends on the underlying cause. Regular physical examinations, routine wellness screening tests, and periodically weighing your pets at home can help with early detection of medical problems that […]
  • MEDICATION MONITORING – Feline - Medication monitoring can help ensure that your pet is not experiencing unwanted side effects from a medication. It can also tell your veterinarian whether the medication may need to be adjusted. All medications have potential side effects. If you are giving your pet more than one medication, the medications may interfere with each other, causing […]
  • MICROCHIPPING YOUR PET – Feline - Many lost pets are never returned to their owners because they do not have any form of identification. Microchips are a way of permanently identifying your pet. Microchips must be registered with a microchip company to reunite you with your pet. Microchipping is a simple, quick procedure that can be performed by your veterinarian. Why […]
  • NEUTERING – Feline - Neutering is a surgical procedure in which the testicles are removed in a male animal. Neutering prevents unwanted reproduction and can help eliminate negative behavioral effects of male hormones, such as roaming and aggression. Neutering may also be performed to treat testicular and anal tumors and some prostate problems. What Is Neutering? Neutering, also known […]
  • NON-RECOGNITION AGGRESSION IN CATS – Feline - Non-recognition aggression occurs when one cat is uncharacteristically aggressive toward a companion cat after a period of separation. Never let your cats “fight it out.” Interrupt aggression or fighting by clapping your hands loudly, squirting the aggressive cat with a water gun, or directing compressed air (without noise) at the aggressive cat. The aggressive cat […]
  • OBESITY IN PETS: TIPPING THE SCALE IN YOUR FAVOR – Feline - Approximately half of the pets in the United States are either overweight or obese. The health consequences of obesity include increased risk for joint disease, heart and respiratory problems, and diabetes. As with humans, weight management is not a quick fix, and the associated goals and lifestyle changes should be long-term in order to be […]
  • OPHTHALMIC EXAM – Feline - An ophthalmic exam is a thorough examination of the pet’s eyes and the surrounding tissues. The exam may be performed by your veterinarian or by a veterinary ophthalmologist (an eye-care specialist). The exam is generally non-invasive and painless for your pet. The kind of tests performed depend on the nature of the pet’s eye problem. […]
  • ORAVET’ DENTAL SEALANT – Feline - OraVet Dental Sealant is an invisible, polymer sealant that is applied to your pet’s teeth by your veterinarian after a dental cleaning. The sealant adheres to teeth to create an invisible physical barrier that helps prevent bacteria from accumulating on teeth. The sealant may be followed by OraVet Plaque Prevention Gel, a substance that is […]
  • PATELLAR LUXATION – Feline - Patellar luxation occurs when the pet’s patella (kneecap) slips out of its normal position on the femur bone, causing pain, lameness, and instability in the knee. Severity of patellar luxation is graded on a scale of 1 to 4. Surgical correction may be recommended. Failure to treat patellar luxation can result in arthritis and lead […]
  • PEMPHIGUS – Feline - Pemphigus is a potentially fatal autoimmune disease of the skin. Skin cells are under attack by the dog or cat’s own immune system. Pemphigus can be treated with short- or long-term use of immunosuppressive medications. Disease resistance to treatment and side effects of medications account for most deaths caused by this disease. What Is Pemphigus? […]
  • PERIODONTAL DISEASE IN CATS – Feline - More than 85% of cats over 4 years of age have periodontal disease. Periodontal disease is a progressive inflammation of the supporting structures around the teeth. Signs of periodontal disease include bad breath, redness or bleeding along the gum line, drooling, difficulty chewing, and loose or missing teeth. Periodontal disease is diagnosed by examining the […]
  • PET CARDIOPULMONARY RESUSCITATION (CPR) – Feline - If your pet has a cardiac arrest, you can help save his or her life by performing cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). By distributing much-needed oxygen and blood throughout a pet’s body, CPR can help do the work that the lungs and heart have stopped doing. If you think that your pet’s breathing or heartbeat has stopped, […]
  • PET HEALTH INSURANCE: WHAT’S RIGHT FOR YOUR PET? – Feline - Pet insurance can help you budget for unforeseen medical expenses for your pet. It’s important to take a hard look at your budget and decide what you need in an insurance policy. “Bare bones” plans typically offer coverage for illnesses and emergencies; “comprehensive” policies tend to include reimbursement for routine care as well. Make sure […]
  • PET SITTER INSTRUCTIONS – Feline - ur sitter during his or her listed hours. Be especially considerate of sitters who operate their businesses from their homes. Make sure to check time zone differences before you call. Give the sitter your contact information: cell phone number, land-line number(s) of where you will be, and e-mail address. Make sure that you have the […]
  • PET TOY SAFETY – Feline - To keep your pet safe, it’s important to know about pet toy hazards and how to avoid them. If you are worried about the safety of your pet’s toys, talk to your veterinarian. Contact your veterinarian if you see your pet swallow a piece of a toy or if your pet vomits, has diarrhea, or […]
  • PHENOBARBITAL LEVEL TEST – Feline - Phenobarbital is a medication that is used to control and prevent seizures. Pets requiring a phenobarbital level test need to have a blood sample drawn at the hospital. The test measures the level of phenobarbital in the blood to determine if the dose is within the correct range to prevent seizures without causing harmful side […]

  • PHYSICAL EXAMINATION AND FELINE DISTEMPER COMBINATION VACCINE – Feline - Cats often hide their illnesses, so physical examination by your veterinarian can help determine if your cat is sick. Regular physical examinations by your veterinarian are recommended for your cat. Feline distemper and feline infectious respiratory disease can cause serious illness in cats and can sometimes be fatal. Cats that go outside are at increased […]

  • PHYSICAL EXAMINATION AND FELINE INFECTIOUS PERITONITIS VACCINE – Feline - Cats tend to hide their illnesses, so physical examination by your veterinarian can help determine if your cat is sick. Regular physical examinations are recommended for all pet cats. Feline infectious peritonitis (FIP), which is caused by a contagious virus, can be an untreatable, fatal illness in cats. Cats housed in group-living situations are at […]

  • PHYSICAL THERAPY AND REHABILITATION – Feline - Physical therapy and rehabilitation involve the use of therapeutic exercises to help patients recover from acute and chronic health conditions resulting from illness, trauma, or surgery. Physical therapy can reduce pain and improve joint range of motion. Physical therapy can include hydrotherapy, massage therapy, cold/heat therapy, therapeutic ultrasound, and electrical stimulation therapy. Be sure to […]

  • PICA AND COPROPHAGY – Feline - Pica is the eating of nonfood substances such as rocks and clothing. Coprophagy is the consumption of feces, and it is more common in dogs than in cats. When eaten, some objects may block the digestive tract and require surgical removal or retrieval with an endoscope. The cause of these behaviors in unknown, but, rarely, […]

  • PNEUMONIA IN CATS – Feline - When the lungs are infected or inflamed, fluid and other material can accumulate, resulting in pneumonia. A variety of bacterial, viral, and fungal organisms can cause pneumonia in cats. Pneumonia is treatable in most cases. However, if the cat is very young, very old, or already sick with another condition, the outcome may not be […]

  • POLYURIA AND POLYDIPSIA – Feline - Polyuria (PU) and polydipsia (PD) refer to excessive urination and excessive drinking, respectively. Polyuria and polydipsia can be associated with a variety of medical conditions. Polyuria and polydipsia are signs of illness, so the treatment depends on the underlying cause. Fortunately, most conditions that cause polyuria and polydipsia are manageable or curable. What Are Polyuria […]

  • POTASSIUM BROMIDE LEVEL TEST – Feline - Potassium bromide is a medication used to control or prevent seizures. A potassium bromide level test is used to determine if the dose is appropriate to control seizures without causing harmful side effects. The test requires a simple blood sample at your veterinarian’s office. Signs of potassium bromide toxicosis include sedation, rear-limb weakness, and incoordination […]

  • PREGNANCY IN CATS – Feline - In cats, pregnancy lasts for 56 to 79 days, or approximately 9 weeks. Pregnancy is determined by feeling (palpating) the developing kittens in the abdomen or by radiography (x-ray) and/or ultrasonography (ultrasound). Pregnant cats should be fed a well-balanced commercial diet and should have access to fresh water at all times. What Is Pregnancy? Pregnancy […]

  • PREVENTING HEARTWORMS AND FLEAS – Feline - Heartworms and fleas are parasites that can cause serious problems. Fortunately, these parasites can be prevented by using safe, effective, and easy-to-administer medications. Heartworm disease damages the heart, lungs, and related blood vessels and can be fatal. This disease is transmitted through the bite of an infected mosquito. Heartworm disease in dogs is treatable, but […]

  • PROBIOTICS – Feline - Probiotics are beneficial bacteria that compete with harmful bacteria to restore the proper bacterial balance in the intestines of dogs and cats. Probiotics are administered when an overgrowth of harmful bacteria result in diarrhea, vomiting, or gas. Different probiotic bacteria have different effects on the digestive tract. Because probiotic products on the market can vary […]

  • PROFENDER’ FOR CATS – Feline - Roundworms, hookworms, and tapeworms are parasites that live in the intestines of cats. Profender treats and controls roundworm, hookworm, and tapeworm infections in cats. Some intestinal parasites are contagious to humans, so protecting pets also protects family members. What Are Roundworms, Hookworms, and Tapeworms? Roundworms, hookworms, and tapeworms are extremely common parasites that spend their […]

  • PROGRAM’ INJECTION FOR CATS – Feline - Program is a drug that helps control fleas on dogs and cats. Program has several formulations—tablets, an oral liquid, and an injectable solution. The injectable formulation of Program is only for use in cats. Proper use of Program injection is associated with very few side effects. What Is Program? Program is a drug that helps […]

  • PULMONARY EDEMA – Feline - Pulmonary edema is an accumulation of fluid in the lungs. Many veterinarians use results of chest radiographs (x-rays) to confirm a diagnosis of pulmonary edema. In most cases, medication can resolve pulmonary edema, but the long-term outcome depends heavily on the underlying cause. What Is Pulmonary Edema? Most lung tissue is made up of tiny […]

  • PYODERMA – Feline - Pyoderma is a bacterial infection of the skin. It varies in severity from a superficial rash to deep, pus-filled ulcerations. Problems that can lead to pyoderma include parasites, allergies, and hormonal imbalances. Treatment of pyoderma is aimed at clearing the infection and treating the primary cause. What Is Pyoderma? Pyoderma is a bacterial infection of […]

  • PYOMETRAPYOMETRA – Feline - Pyometra is a severe bacterial infection of the uterus that can be life threatening. It can occur in any unspayed female cat or dog. Older, unspayed female dogs that have not had a litter are most commonly affected. Hormones can cause the uterine lining to thicken and form cysts, creating an ideal breeding ground for […]

  • RABIES – Feline - Rabies is a deadly disease that is generally fatal in all species. It is transmitted through contact with saliva of an infected animal. There is no effective treatment in animals. It is virtually preventable through vaccination. What Is It? Rabies is a deadly disease caused by a virus that attacks the central nervous system. All […]

  • RADIOGRAPHY – Feline - Radiography is painless, very safe, and noninvasive, and it can sometimes be performed during an outpatient visit while you wait. Radiography is useful for evaluating the bones and the size, shape, and position of internal organs. Sedation is sometimes recommended for patients undergoing radiography. Radiography can help your veterinarian diagnose numerous medical conditions, including broken […]

  • REFILLING MEDICATIONS – Feline - Remembering to refill prescriptions on time helps protect your pet’s safety and health. Some veterinarians require 24 hours’ notice for prescription refills, so be sure to allow enough time for your request to be processed. The best way to avoid running out of medication is to plan ahead and order refills on time. Despite our […]

  • RINGWORM – Feline - Ringworm is a fungal infection of the skin, hair, and/or nails in dogs and cats. It is a zoonotic disease, meaning that it can be transmitted from animals to humans. The infection is also contagious among animals. Ringworm is transmitted by direct contact with an infected animal or by touching objects that have been exposed […]

  • RODENTICIDE POISONING – Feline - Many mouse and rat poisons contain ingredients that can be toxic and even fatal to your pet. These toxins may cause blood clotting problems, nervous system problems, or kidney failure. Signs of poisoning include pale gums, bruising, bleeding from the mouth or nose, seizures, and increased drinking and urination. If your pet has ingested a […]

  • ROUNDWORMS – Feline - Roundworms are parasites that live in the intestines of dogs and cats. Roundworm infections can be transmitted from animals to humans. Depending on the type of roundworm, pets can be infected by their mother during pregnancy or nursing, by eating roundworm eggs in the environment, or by eating infected rodents or birds. Signs in pets […]

  • SEBORRHEA – Feline - Seborrhea is a general term used to describe skin and hair that has excessive flaking or grease. While primary seborrhea is a rare inherited disease, most cases of seborrhea are secondary to other disease processes such as allergies, external parasites, infections, and glandular or immune system diseases. Treatment for the underlying disease may help resolve cases […]

  • SELECTING A GROOMER – Feline - Groomers are not regulated or licensed by a government agency. When looking for a groomer, seek recommendations from friends, veterinarians, trainers, and boarding facilities. When looking for a groomer, visit the grooming facility during regular business hours to check the cleanliness and observe how pets are handled. When visiting a grooming facility, ask about its […]

  • SELECTING A NEW KITTEN – Feline - Take your time when deciding whether a kitten is right for you. The kitten you choose may be with you for 10 to 20 years or more. For best social development, a kitten should remain with its mother and/or littermates until 12 weeks of age. It can be tempting to adopt more than one or […]

  • SERUM BIOCHEMISTRY PROFILE – Feline - A serum biochemistry profile is a blood test that provides an overview of many of the body’s functions. Performing a serum biochemistry profile poses minimal risk for your pet, and in many cases, the information your veterinarian gains from this testing is very valuable. Your veterinarian may recommend that your pet not receive any food […]

  • SKIN PROBLEMS AND YOUR PET – Feline - A variety of skin problems can affect dogs and cats, including allergies, bacterial and fungal infections, and parasite infestations. The signs of skin problems in pets can be very similar, so it is important to have your veterinarian examine your pet to determine the cause of the problem. Most skin problems in pets are curable […]

  • SPAY SURGERY – Feline - A spay is a surgical procedure in which the ovaries and uterus are surgically removed. Spaying prevents unwanted pregnancy and discontinues heat cycles. Spaying may also be performed to treat certain medical conditions, such as a uterine infection. When performed early in life, spaying can decrease the chance of your pet getting breast cancer. What […]

  • SPAYING OR NEUTERING YOUR PET – Feline - Spaying and neutering are surgical procedures to remove reproductive organs. These procedures are typically recommended for puppies and kittens before they reach sexual maturity (at about 5 months old). Spaying or neutering your pet prevents him or her from having unwanted offspring. It also has very important health and behavior benefits for your pet. General […]

  • SUMMER HAZARDS AND YOUR CAT – Feline - When temperatures outside reach dangerous levels, the temperature inside the house can, too. Keep fresh water available, and make sure your cat has a cool place to spend the day. Bring your cat indoors if a heat advisory is issued, or if severe weather (heavy rain, high winds, flooding) is expected. Keep vaccines up to […]

  • TAIL DOCKING – Feline - Tail docking, also known by the term caudectomy, is the surgical removal of a portion of the tail. Surgical caudectomy can be performed for medical reasons, such as to ensure complete tumor removal or to alleviate excessive skin folds around the base of the tail. In most cases, tail docking is a cosmetic procedure without apparent […]

  • TAPEWORMS – Felin - Tapeworms are long, flat, parasitic worms that live in the intestines of dogs and cats. Pets generally become infected by ingesting fleas that contain tapeworm larvae during grooming. Pets may also become infected by eating prey that is infected with tapeworm larvae. Most tapeworm infections do not cause illness in pets. People can get tapeworm […]

  • THE WELLNESS EXAMINATION – Feline - A wellness exam is an overall general health assessmentthat may include blood tests, urinalysis, and parasite screening. A wellness exam is recommended for most pets at least annually. Some veterinarians recommend wellness exams at least every 6 months for senior pets and pets with chronic health issues. A wellness exam can help ensure your pet’s […]

  • THROMBOCYTOPENIA (DECREASED PLATELET COUNT) – Felin - Thrombocytopenia is a life-threatening condition leading to uncontrollable bleeding and severe anemia. It is a decrease in the number of platelets, which are necessary to form clots. Various diseases may lead to thrombocytopenia. Immediate medical attention is necessary for survival. The success of treatment depends on the primary disease and response to treatment. What Is […]

  • THYROID LEVEL TEST/THYROID PROFILE TESTS/FELINE HYPERTHYROIDISM – Feline - Feline hyperthyroidism is a disorder caused by the production of too much thyroid hormone by one of both of the thyroid glands. Diagnosis of feline hyperthyroidism is made by evaluation of clinical signs, physical examination, and one or more thyroid level blood tests. A baseline thyroid level test is a blood test that measures the […]

  • TICKS AND YOUR CAT – Feline - Ticks can transmit dangerous diseases, like cytauxzoonosis, when they attach to a cat and feed. Your veterinarian can recommend safe and effective products to help protect your cat from ticks. You should never remove a tick with your fingers. Tweezers or tick removal tools work well. When in doubt, ask your veterinary care team for […]

  • TRAVELING WITH YOUR CAT – Feline - Bring enough of your cat’s regular food and medication for the duration of the trip. If you plan to travel with your pet, let your veterinarian know ahead of time; your cat may need a health certificate, or there may be other health issues to address. How Can I Make the Travel Experience Better for […]

  • TREATING HEARTWORM DISEASE – Feline - Heartworm disease is a serious and potentially fatal condition that damages the heart, lungs, and related blood vessels. Dogs and cats are at risk for becoming infected with heartworms. Heartworm disease in dogs is treatable, but in some cases, treatment can be costly and complicated. There are no approved products for heartworm treatment in cats. […]

  • TRIMMING YOUR CAT’S NAILS – Feline - Nail trimming should be a calm, stress-free experience for you and your cat. If your cat experiences pain from nail trimming, you will probably have trouble trimming his or her nails in the future, so make sure that you clip just the tip of each nail. Contact your veterinarian if you are unsure of how […]

  • ULTRASONOGRAPHY – Feline - Ultrasonography is a diagnostic technique that allows your veterinarian to look inside your pet’s body without surgery. Ultrasonography uses reflected sound waves to create images of organs or spaces inside your pet’s body. Ultrasonography is painless and noninvasive. In many situations, it can be conducted while the pet is awake. What Is Ultrasonography? Ultrasonography is […]

  • UNDERSTANDING PET FOOD LABELS – Feline - Understanding pet food labels is the first step in choosing the right food to help make an optimal nutritional plan for a pet. Animals require specific nutrients from the ingredients in their foods. The new regulation to include calorie information on pet food labels might help decrease the number of overweight pets. Pet owners can […]

  • URINALYSIS AND EARLY KIDNEY DISEASE DETECTION – Feline - In kidney disease, the kidneys do not function properly. Acute (sudden) kidney disease may be reversible, but chronic (long-term) kidney disease is usually progressive, meaning that it worsens over time. Kidney disease can be detected early with the help of a urinalysis. A urinalysis is an examination of a dog’s or cat’s urine to assess […]

  • URINARY TRACT DISEASE IN CATS – Feline - Urinary tract disease is a very general term used to describe any one of several conditions that can affect any part of the urinary tract. Clinical signs associated with urinary tract disease vary depending on the exact condition. Some types of urinary tract disease can be reversed with treatment, while other conditions, such as chronic kidney […]

  • URINE CULTURE TEST – Feline - A urine culture test is done to identify the specific bacteria that are causing a urinary tract infection. Ideally, a sample of urine is collected by cystocentesis in which a needle is inserted directly into the animal’s bladder. The urine sample is placed on a special medium and incubated to allow the bacteria to grow. After the […]

  • URINE SPECIFIC GRAVITY TEST – Feline - The urine specific gravity (SG) test tells your veterinarian how concentrated your pet’s urine is (how much water it contains). Collecting a urine sample for SG measurement can be done at your veterinarian’s office or, sometimes, at home. If your pet’s urine SG is abnormal, additional tests may be recommended to determine the cause. What […]

  • VACCINE TITER TESTING – Feline - Vaccine titer tests measure the level of specific antibodies in a pet’s blood. Titer tests can help determine whether a puppy’s or kitten’s immune system has responded appropriately to an initial vaccine series. Some veterinarians use vaccine titer tests to help guide decisions regarding whether a pet should be revaccinated for certain diseases. What Is […]

  • VACCINE-ASSOCIATED SARCOMAS IN CATS – Feline - Vaccine-associated sarcomas are cancerous tumors that occur at vaccination sites in cats. Approximately 1 to 2 out of every 10,000 vaccinated cats develop this condition. Your cat should be seen by a veterinarian if you notice swelling at the vaccination site that grows larger after 1 month, is bigger than 2 cm (0.79 inches), or […]

  • VALVULAR HEART DISEASE – Feline - Heart valves help control movement of blood through the heart; valvular heart disease can develop when heart valves are not working properly. Your veterinarian may recommend a cardiac evaluation if valvular heart disease is suspected. Most cases of valvular heart disease are treated with medication, but severely affected pets may not survive, despite medical treatment. […]

  • VESTIBULAR DISEASE – Feline - Vestibular disease is a medical condition that affects the nervous system. Clinical signs of vestibular disease include incoordination (instability when trying to stand or walk), head tilt, and circling to one side. Sometimes the cause of vestibular disease remains undiagnosed, but underlying causes can include thyroid disease (in dogs) or a middle/inner ear infection. Spontaneous […]

  • VOMITING – Feline - Vomiting is the forceful emptying of the stomach. If vomiting is prolonged, it can lead to dehydration. Vomiting can be associated with several medical conditions ranging from motion sickness to foreign body ingestion to cancer. Treatment is aimed at controlling the vomiting and resolving the primary cause. A safe environment, healthy diet, routine veterinary care, […]

  • VON WILLEBRAND’S DISEASE – Feline - Von Willebrand’s disease is an inherited bleeding disorder that occurs most commonly in dogs and rarely in cats. It is caused by a deficiency in the quantity or activity of von Willebrand factor, a protein in the blood that helps platelets stick to injured surfaces to form a clot. It is found most commonly in […]

  • WEIGHT CHECK – Feline - A weight check is the measurement of your pet’s weight and the evaluation of your pet’s body condition. A weight check should be performed at every veterinary examination and any time you notice changes in your pet’s weight. Unexpected weight loss may be the first sign of diseases such as diabetes, hyperthyroidism in cats, kidney […]

  • WEST NILE VIRUS AND YOUR PET – Feline - West Nile virus is usually transmitted to dogs and cats through the bite of an infected mosquito. Clinical signs of infection in dogs and cats may be very mild or absent. Protecting your pets from mosquitoes will reduce their risk of exposure to West Nile virus. Ask your veterinarian about safe and effective mosquito-repellant products […]

  • WHEN TO CONSIDER EUTHANASIA – Feline - Euthanasia is the painless, humane termination of life. The decision regarding when to euthanize is fraught with medical, financial, ethical, religious, moral, and sometimes legal considerations. Seeking counsel from family, friends, and others can help with this difficult decision. Ultimately, you must trust yourself to make the best choice for your pet. What Is Euthanasia? […]

  • WHY DO I NEED TO VACCINATE MY PET? – Feline - Vaccination is an important weapon against infectious diseases. Some diseases, like rabies, are transmissible to humans, so protecting your pets also protects your family members and community. Pets that stay indoors also can be exposed to infectious diseases, so even indoor cats can benefit from vaccinations. Vaccines are safe and generally well tolerated by most […]

  • WINTER HAZARDS AND YOUR CAT – Feline - Cats are attracted to the sweet smell and taste of antifreeze, but if eaten, this toxin can quickly cause kidney failure. Outdoor cats depend on people for their warmth and survival during the winter months; special steps need to be taken to keep these cats safe. Holidays are a time for celebration but can pose […]

  • YOUR PET’S PRESCRIBED DIET – Feline - If your pet is on a prescribed diet, keeping him or her on that diet is essential for the best possible health and quality of life. Your veterinarian has carefully selected your pet’s prescribed diet based on his or her specific needs, so this food should not be changed. Please order refills of your pet’s […]